Archives For Conference

Venture+ Forum will be taking place at this year’s #HIMSS16 conference.  Today, four finalists (Bright.md, Flow Health, Sansoro Health, and VUCA Health) selected by the Venture+ Forum, will be presenting their healthtech solutions at the final pitch competition.  

At the conference, one of the main topics of discussion and concern has been around patient engagement and improving one’s personal healthcare experience.  All four of these companies, although very different in their solutions, touch upon improving the patient experience in some way.

Bright.md has a goal to increase the provider panel size by 30%.  Instead of wasting a physician’s time and money, it focuses on getting patients appointments that wouldn’t be filled otherwise.  It focuses on the patient by lowering the costs and time it takes to be seen. The solution has a positive impact on the practice, but makes sure to tune into the patient’s needs as well. Continue Reading…

This week, over 400,000 people ranging from different backgrounds will come together to attend an event that has an impact on all of our lives.  This event is the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Conference of 2016 or in twitter lingo, #HIMSS16

You might be thinking, why does this effect me? No, it’s not because quarterback Peyton Manning will be attending as a keynote.  It’s because HIMSS16 revolves around leveraging IT to better healthcare.  Everyone has experienced a bump in the road or negative experience when it comes to healthcare.  We are all looking for that next big thing to improve these issues.  Having a week of keynotes, panels, meet-ups, showcases, etc. that are dedicated to healthcare innovation, is the perfect place to start conversations about these problems and brainstorm how to go about solving them.  

5 questions causing buzz at HIMSS16:

1.) How can we leverage IT to better healthcare?

This is the overarching question of the whole conference.  Whether you are an attendee that is a physician, data scientist, or representing a vendor, you are attending to better healthcare in some way.  Our team is always looking to use data in different ways to assist in healthcare decisions.  We are optimistic that more data will become open and available to consume. Continue Reading…

On Monday, June 16th we were all ears when it came to NPR’s Morning Edition.  NPR’s Eric Whitney interviewed and featured karmadata on the segment Power to the Health Data Geeks, after karmadata won an award for myHealth.io at the 2014 Health Datapalooza.  We were very excited about this feature, almost as excited as when a new data set is released.

NPR News

NPR News

Listen to full interview here:

[audio http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2014/06/20140616_me_power_to_the_health_data_geeks.mp3 ]

 

DatapaloozaTue-113

The patient facing service created by karmadata wins an award for providing meaningful information to patients at the 2014 Health Datapalooza, a gathering of over 2,000 of the nation’s healthcare experts, which was held on Tuesday in Washington, D.C

WASHINGTON, June 5, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — karmadata (www.karmadata.com) today announced the launch of MyHealth.io, a website that provides patients in need of surgery the ability to find the best surgeon in their area based on each surgeon’s volume and the quality of his or her affiliated hospital. On Tuesday, myHealth.io received one of three financial awards from the Health Data Consortium at the 2014 Health Datapalooza, and the karmadata team had the honor of presenting MyHealth.io to over 2,000 healthcare data experts and patient advocates from around the country.

myHealth.io is our opening salvo in creating free tools for patients, putting them in the driver’s seat for making informed decisions that impact their own healthcare,” said Sean Power, founder and CEO of karmadata. “Each year there are millions of surgeries performed in the U.S. and most patients have absolutely no way to comparison shop for their surgeon. Most surgical patients end up accepting a blind referral, typically from their primary care physician, without having access to important information.”

myhealth.io_map

“The release of physician identifiable data from Medicare has changed all of that,” said Brendan Kelleher, Chief Data Scientist of karmadata. “We link surgical volumes by surgeon for each procedure to data on the surgeon’s hospital. This allows the patient to not only see which surgeon has performed the most procedures, but also specific quality ratings on the surgeon’s affiliated hospital drawn from patient surveys and quantitative performance metrics released each year by CMS. Now comparison shopping for a surgeon using important factors such as volume and quality is easy.”

“My job is to think about each patient’s experience on myHealth.io,” said Yesi Orihuela, Head of Design and UX of karmadata. “We built the site for healthcare consumers, not data or industry experts. Your journey on the site starts by entering your zip code. From there you are led step by step through a body map to find your surgery, a list of surgeons that perform it, and a map and data visualization that make it easy to identify and locate the surgeon that is best for you.”

About karmadata and MyHealth.io
karmadata is the world’s healthcare (big) data, simplified. Using big data and cloud technologies, karmadata is able to standardize and link the world’s healthcare data ranging from leading open data sources to private pharmacy and medical claims. karmadata created myHealth.io as a free service to patients to enable comparison shopping for surgical services and will expand to enable a broad range of healthcare consumer activities. Learn more by visiting www.karmadata.com, www.myhealth.io, or by following them on Twitter @karmadata @myhealthio

About the Health Data Consortium
Health Data Consortium is a collaboration among government, non-profit, and private sector organizations working to foster the availability and innovative use of data to improve health and health care. The Consortium advocates for health data liberation; promotes best practices and information sharing; and works with businesses, entrepreneurs, and academia to help them understand how to use health data to develop new products, services, apps, and research insights. Learn more at www.healthdataconsortium.org or @hdconsortium on Twitter.

@Data2x Summit Live Blog

yesi79 —  April 30, 2013 — Leave a comment

data2Summit

9:15am: Opening Keynote by James Strittholt

James Strittholt @data2xDataBasin.org

James Strittholt delivers the keynote at Data2.0 Summit on Climate Change through GEO data. James provided an amazing live demo of DataBasin.org in which he visualized the effects of climate change via interactive and configurable maps in realtime with high quality data.

9:50am: Heard a great quote

“90% of the world’s data has been added in the last two years”

10am: PANEL: From Climate Data To Technology Solutions

data2xdata2x

Great discussion by the panel and was very impressed by Daniel Goldfarb, Partner, Director of Design Research, Greenstart who provided great insights in the current data inustry. Below are a few quotes by Daniel:

“The amount of ‘dashboard’ startups we see is staggering, but simply having a lot of data is not a business model. There’s a need for actionable end points for data driven decision making.”

“Gamification is the worst word in our industry. It doesn’t do anything in most cases.”

“Did you know that some of the small utility companies contract outside firms to retrieve email address of their own customers?”

A great question posed by Daniel Goldfarb: “Which car type do you think will be more prevalent in the next five years, EV or Self Driving cars?”

10:50am: PANEL: Data Science and Algorithms-as-a-Service
With a QA format, I’ve found it easier to jot down the best answers heard during the panel. Data is heavy but algorithms are light. Best strategy to address this difference is to place the algorithm where the data lives. A new strategy is to “burn” the model (IF THEN statements) into the chips themselves. Do you think data as service replaces data scientists? Absolutely not. How to use data successfully and what questions to ask become very important. There are many companies and organizations out there who don’t know they have data problems.

Algorithmia: Interesting startup that provides a marketplace for connecting algorithm developers with companies needing solutions.

12pm: Crowdsourcing the Oct Dataweek conference
During lunch the lead organizers of Data2.0 asked all of us to suggest topics we’d like to be covered at the next Data2.0 conference. Of the ideas suggested, then voted on by everyone, Data Predictability was at the top of the list.

12:30pm: Disqus demo of Gravity

Disqus Gravity

12:40pm: Fibit demo’d their latest product, app and API
Fitbit API can be reviewed here

3:20pm: PANEL: Democratizing Data: A business, technology, and society problem
How do we democratize the power of data? On the question of what are the inhibiters to democratizing data, Bruno Aziza from SiSense provided fantastic insights. Bruno outlined a few top inhibiters:

  1. Price: It’s currently too high a price to gain access to the data
  2. There’s an imbalance with the cost of storage versus crunching the data. It currently costs $1M to crunch 1TB of data versus the very cheap costs to store it.
  3. Although complex, we shouldn’t take an elitist closed approach to analyzing data. We should enable the consumer to analyze on their own without the need for experts.

Diego Oppenheimer from Microsoft touched upon the need for education to the consumer. With the increase of easy to use tools being created, how do we reduce the risk of incorrect conclusions made by the user.

On the question of how can we make users more data savvy, Diego pointed out that the issue starts with the fact that data is not clean and thus un-appealing to users to even get started. Diego mentioned that Microsoft has taken a visual and explorer approach with their Data Explorer product offering.

4:10pm Top 5 Startup Pitch Event
Out of 20 startup applicants across the country, karmadata was chosen along with 4 other startups to present during the Startup Pitch event. The other startups include Algorithms.io, MarkedUp, Vertascale and Virtue. You can read about them here.

Sean Power presenting at #data2summit #startup pitch event.

4:50pm PANEL: Big Friendly Data: Making Big Data Accessible to Non-wizards
How much of their own data is the average organization using? Only 15%. Organizations today can improve their use of data by simply taking a closer look at their own data.

What is the holy grail? It’s being able to take any business problem, use the data you already have and work with your current resources/team to reduce the amount of time to market (within 30days).

5:20pm: Top Startup Announced
Algorithmia.io was selected as the top startup.

Disruptive Innovations to Advance Clinical Trials, Envizualized

Conference illustration by Jonny Goldstein of Envizualize

Sean and I recently attended the 2nd Annual Disruptive Innovations to Advance Clinical Trials for Pharma, Biologics, & Devices (DPharm) in Boston. We had a really great time and learned a ton.

Here are a few themes that really stood out for me:

An increasing momentum for collaboration among pharma:

Tom Krohn of Eli Lilly kicked off the conference by bluntly telling us why we need to change the current industry paradigm: because it’s completely unsustainable. Yikes. While radical changes in this industry might feel like trying to pull a 180 in the Titanic, progress is being made.

Elise Felicione of Janssen detailed a cross-pharma investigator databank that is advancing. Janssen, Merck, and Lilly are collaborating on a project that combines their investigator lists into a database hosted by DrugDev.org (we want to be a part of this effort!). While the project has only reached exploratory stages to this point, they have gotten past some very difficult hurdles involving lawyers, red tape, and the like. Did you know about all of the redundant tasks that take place between sponsor and investigator, like how investigators have to go through Good Clinical Practice training with each sponsor that they work with? As a data geek residing on the peripheries of the industry, I did not. Reducing these “redundant burdens” is a no-brainer, but implementing is no easy task. It will take indomitable leaders to overcome the resistance to sharing competitive intelligence, but luckily it appears that such leaders are in place.

Continue Reading…