Archives For Open data

Vaccine Trials Data Card
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karmadata enables users to visualize and simply query the world’s healthcare data.  So why can’t the excel download sheets be simple to navigate as well?  Now they are!  The format of the existing download has greatly improved.  We have cleared away unnecessary columns and provide only the information that is important to you.  We have organized the columns and also added a different tab for clinical trials.  Now the user is able to toggle back and forth between a tab for clinical trials, and a tab for sponsors.

excel downloadThis download is clean, simple, and user friendly.  Feel free to jump up and down (like we did) when you realize how painless this excel sheet is to navigate through.

At the karmadata HQ the developers have been working diligently to create more filters to expand the abilities that Sponsor Finder has.  There have been multiple additions already and we want to share them with you.  The first addition that has been made is the visualizations of trial timelines.  This gives the user the ability to quickly see a comparison between the actual vs. expected for a trial as well as different events that have occured.

trial timeline

After running a Sponsor Finder search, you will be able to find these visualizations by clicking on the number of trials in the middle of the green circle.  This will bring you to the list of clinical trials page.  Right away you are able to see the trial timelines right under it’s trial listing.

karmadata___Sponsor_Finder

 

Some of the events that you would be able to see on the timeline include: original/actual start and end dates, addition of trial sites, when a trial is announced, and enrollment dates.  The blue line is the current timeline and grey is the original timeline.  This will give our clients the ability to easily see trial delays/events instead of having to dig into the source.  In the end, saves you and your team time-which is what Sponsor Finder aims to do!  More updates on Sponsor Finder additions to follow.

California leads the way with roughly 8k EHR Meaningful Use Installs

California leads the way with roughly 8k EHR Meaningful Use Installs

On Monday, June 16th we were all ears when it came to NPR’s Morning Edition.  NPR’s Eric Whitney interviewed and featured karmadata on the segment Power to the Health Data Geeks, after karmadata won an award for myHealth.io at the 2014 Health Datapalooza.  We were very excited about this feature, almost as excited as when a new data set is released.

NPR News

NPR News

Listen to full interview here:

[audio http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2014/06/20140616_me_power_to_the_health_data_geeks.mp3 ]

 

DatapaloozaTue-113

The patient facing service created by karmadata wins an award for providing meaningful information to patients at the 2014 Health Datapalooza, a gathering of over 2,000 of the nation’s healthcare experts, which was held on Tuesday in Washington, D.C

WASHINGTON, June 5, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — karmadata (www.karmadata.com) today announced the launch of MyHealth.io, a website that provides patients in need of surgery the ability to find the best surgeon in their area based on each surgeon’s volume and the quality of his or her affiliated hospital. On Tuesday, myHealth.io received one of three financial awards from the Health Data Consortium at the 2014 Health Datapalooza, and the karmadata team had the honor of presenting MyHealth.io to over 2,000 healthcare data experts and patient advocates from around the country.

myHealth.io is our opening salvo in creating free tools for patients, putting them in the driver’s seat for making informed decisions that impact their own healthcare,” said Sean Power, founder and CEO of karmadata. “Each year there are millions of surgeries performed in the U.S. and most patients have absolutely no way to comparison shop for their surgeon. Most surgical patients end up accepting a blind referral, typically from their primary care physician, without having access to important information.”

myhealth.io_map

“The release of physician identifiable data from Medicare has changed all of that,” said Brendan Kelleher, Chief Data Scientist of karmadata. “We link surgical volumes by surgeon for each procedure to data on the surgeon’s hospital. This allows the patient to not only see which surgeon has performed the most procedures, but also specific quality ratings on the surgeon’s affiliated hospital drawn from patient surveys and quantitative performance metrics released each year by CMS. Now comparison shopping for a surgeon using important factors such as volume and quality is easy.”

“My job is to think about each patient’s experience on myHealth.io,” said Yesi Orihuela, Head of Design and UX of karmadata. “We built the site for healthcare consumers, not data or industry experts. Your journey on the site starts by entering your zip code. From there you are led step by step through a body map to find your surgery, a list of surgeons that perform it, and a map and data visualization that make it easy to identify and locate the surgeon that is best for you.”

About karmadata and MyHealth.io
karmadata is the world’s healthcare (big) data, simplified. Using big data and cloud technologies, karmadata is able to standardize and link the world’s healthcare data ranging from leading open data sources to private pharmacy and medical claims. karmadata created myHealth.io as a free service to patients to enable comparison shopping for surgical services and will expand to enable a broad range of healthcare consumer activities. Learn more by visiting www.karmadata.com, www.myhealth.io, or by following them on Twitter @karmadata @myhealthio

About the Health Data Consortium
Health Data Consortium is a collaboration among government, non-profit, and private sector organizations working to foster the availability and innovative use of data to improve health and health care. The Consortium advocates for health data liberation; promotes best practices and information sharing; and works with businesses, entrepreneurs, and academia to help them understand how to use health data to develop new products, services, apps, and research insights. Learn more at www.healthdataconsortium.org or @hdconsortium on Twitter.

medicare-reimbursement-drg

Major joint replacements cost Medicare more than $6B in 2011

Yesterday there was quite a bit of buzz about the release of Medicare’s inpatient payments for the top 100 diagnosis related groups.  The Washington Post published some highlights on the data including a neat widget to visualize the data.  We decided to take our own shot at it.  This was a fun dataset for us since we were able to leverage a ton of work that we’ve already done.  We had already standardized entities for hospital, organization, DRG, and city from other CMS datasets.  I downloaded the data at 3 PM and had it up and running on karmadata by 5.  We added a couple of calculated measures for total amount paid by Medicare and discrepancy between amount charged and amount received, and started making datacards.

Here’s what folks are saying:

Orphan Drug Designations

Orphan drugs have been a hot topic of late.  We created this card which shows a steady increase in the number of companies receiving orphan drug designations from the FDA.

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This datacard caught our eye since we’ve seen recent news reports on the increased requests by foreign governments for user data to Google and Microsoft as reported by Forbes. Events such as Monday’s Boston bombings likely cause a spike in such activity (and for good reason).

karmadata_wordCloudPuzzle

People are inherently social.  Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Spotify, FourSquare.  The social media list goes on.  And while many people avoid social media for reasons ranging from privacy concerns (more on this later) to not wanting to know what everyone is doing 24 hours a day (everyone has a friend or two who are social media spammers), the overall popularity of these sites indicates an almost unquenchable thirst for socializing, sharing, collaborating, and interacting.

What Facebook is to friends and photos, LinkedIn is to colleagues and work connections, and Spotify is to music fans and music, karmadata is to data consumers and data visualizations.  So even while we are heads down, programming, and buried in code, there is always an overriding sentiment in the back of our minds: we are building something social, collaborative, and most importantly, fun.

Another form of online interaction is blogging (like this one), and making data visualizations into mini-blog posts is the inspiration behind where we are heading with our datacard design.  The idea is that each datacard tests or validates a theory, and the user can then publish their insights on karmadata.  We are trying to make datacard creation as personalized, interactive, and fun as possible.  That means creating custom titles, descriptions, x and y-axis labels, and anything else that our user community can come up with.  We do our best to provide users with the basics, but our vision is that our users will take the value of the datacards to another level.  That means that an auto-generated y-axis of “# of Clinical Trials” can be quickly altered to “# of Phase III Leukemia Trials”.  Editing filters, seeing how it affects the data, customizing the metadata.  All of this should be fun.

That’s the fun part.  The social part is sharing that mini-blog with your friends and colleagues, engaging in comments back and forth, and leveraging the expertise of each other to answer questions and solve problems.  Or it can be finding a datacard that someone else has already created that answers the same question that you have.  This sharing and collaboration is the first half of our namesake.  The idea is that you get out of the community what you put into it.  Sharing is good karma.

Now much like the person who wants to “stay off the grid”, we recognize that many data consumers will not want to share because they do not want others seeing what they are interested in.  Many pharma, in particular, have a paranoia about competitors knowing what they are up to, and in many cases these concerns are valid.  But since we want everyone to share, our philosophy is that if you don’t want to share, then you have to pay to avoid sharing.  In such as case, a company can pay for karmadata Plus to unlock functionality for everyone at their company to remain anonymous and closed off from the rest of the community (Plus users also receive other benefits like data download and upload of internal data but that’s a story for another day).

In any case, we ask you to share your ideas with us about how to make the site more fun and social (because that’s good karma).