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This week, over 400,000 people ranging from different backgrounds will come together to attend an event that has an impact on all of our lives.  This event is the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Conference of 2016 or in twitter lingo, #HIMSS16

You might be thinking, why does this effect me? No, it’s not because quarterback Peyton Manning will be attending as a keynote.  It’s because HIMSS16 revolves around leveraging IT to better healthcare.  Everyone has experienced a bump in the road or negative experience when it comes to healthcare.  We are all looking for that next big thing to improve these issues.  Having a week of keynotes, panels, meet-ups, showcases, etc. that are dedicated to healthcare innovation, is the perfect place to start conversations about these problems and brainstorm how to go about solving them.  

5 questions causing buzz at HIMSS16:

1.) How can we leverage IT to better healthcare?

This is the overarching question of the whole conference.  Whether you are an attendee that is a physician, data scientist, or representing a vendor, you are attending to better healthcare in some way.  Our team is always looking to use data in different ways to assist in healthcare decisions.  We are optimistic that more data will become open and available to consume. Continue Reading…

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If you are involved in the study start up process, you know how important it is to have the best investigators.  Having the best investigators allows you to be successful in enrolling patients.  Many have their own investigator database, but when there is difficulty, they usually resort to PubMed, registries, and other data.  This data is difficult to navigate and becomes a time suck.

Indicate Investigators has all the data available, but organizes it in a way that is easy to navigate and will save you time.

Below is the launch page to search by Drug/Drug Class OR Disease.  We curate all publicly available sources that have data on investigators, mining the data from its native html, text or XML, and loading into structured, linked data on each Investigator. We know what trials they participated in, how many trials, and how frequently they work within specific disease indications.

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Once you decide what to search for, you will be directed to the results page of all investigators involved in that indication. Continue Reading…

Sponsor Finder is a tool created to allow our users to search and identify sales opportunities at trial sponsors.  Pinpointing opportunities at the right moment can be difficult because once the trial is announced, it is likely that everyone to work with is already lined up.  You can utilize the filters in Sponsor Finder, avoid this problem and stay ahead of the curve.  

One search that is popular among current users, is to look for organizations that have trials completing in the next 6 months.

karmadata___Sponsor_Finder

I will throw out a specific example: “I am on a team with phase 3, breast cancer trial experience…How do I search?”  You would plug the following into Sponsor Finder: phase 1/2 and 2, active, breast cancer trials, that are completing in the next 180 days.  Continue Reading…

In case you didn’t notice, there is a new feature in Sponsor Finder.  On the left side of the page, just under “Reset” and “Search”, you can select “Find sponsor management contacts“. 

Sponsor Contacts Search

Although you can find contacts through companies that are returned in a Sponsor Finder search, this section allows you to search by title, name, location, or level across ALL sponsors.  There are over 500K management contacts (with email and phone numbers), which are all provided through ZoomInfo. Many of our users are currently using it to get lists of contacts together for projects, email campaigns, sales pipelines, etc.

If you would like a refresher or training of the system, you can always sign up for our weekly webinars at http://www.karmadata.com/training

#IceBucketChallenge

abbywellskd —  August 8, 2014 — 1 Comment

I think by now if you are living in or around Boston you have heard of the #IceBucketChallenge to #StrikeoutALS.  The Ice Bucket Challenge was created to raise awareness for support of ALS and more specifically Pete Frates.  Pete is a former Boston College baseball captain who is battling the disease. If you are nominated to complete the challenge, you must film yourself pouring a bucket of ice water on your head, after nominating others to complete the challenge within 24 hours.  By now you have probably seen Pro Athletes, friends, family, and even politicians completing this challenge.

While watching Pete Frates’ video on his site, I learned what rewriting the end of ALS meant to him.  “Rewriting the end of ALS means raising money to get better research for treatment and ultimately finding a cure.”  So if you head over to karmadata, we can dig into the research part of ALS.  You are able to see below that the number of Industry Sponsored ALS trials are declining.  As Pete said, the way to a cure is through research.  We need to raise the amount of research that is being done.

ALS TrialsIf you head over to Sponsor Finder and search for ALS Trials, you will see that there are only 8 companies actively conducting ALS clinical trials.

ALS

 

Lastly, this data card below shows government funding.  John Hopkins University being the top organization who grants money to ALS.

ALS_Grant Money

 

So what does all this mean?  This challenge is to create awareness for ALS and I believe it is working.  When I log in to facebook, it’s the first thing I see and it fills my news feed from top to bottom.  By creating awareness, we are able to become more knowledgable on ALS and more likely to donate to the cause, which will hopefully result in more research.  With all of the visualizations on funding and number of companies/trials, you can see that ALS may not be something people are too aware of.  The Challenge will definitely not cure anything right away, but it is a big step in the right direction!

A couple of us here at karmadata have already donated to ALS and completed the Ice Bucket Challenge, even our CEO Sean Power who completed it last night!  We urge you to visit petefrates.com and donate!  You can also check out the sweet Frate Train gear at petefrates.storenvy.com

 

Vaccine Trials Data Card

At the karmadata HQ the developers have been working diligently to create more filters to expand the abilities that Sponsor Finder has.  There have been multiple additions already and we want to share them with you.  The first addition that has been made is the visualizations of trial timelines.  This gives the user the ability to quickly see a comparison between the actual vs. expected for a trial as well as different events that have occured.

trial timeline

After running a Sponsor Finder search, you will be able to find these visualizations by clicking on the number of trials in the middle of the green circle.  This will bring you to the list of clinical trials page.  Right away you are able to see the trial timelines right under it’s trial listing.

karmadata___Sponsor_Finder

 

Some of the events that you would be able to see on the timeline include: original/actual start and end dates, addition of trial sites, when a trial is announced, and enrollment dates.  The blue line is the current timeline and grey is the original timeline.  This will give our clients the ability to easily see trial delays/events instead of having to dig into the source.  In the end, saves you and your team time-which is what Sponsor Finder aims to do!  More updates on Sponsor Finder additions to follow.

KARMADATA SCREENSHOT
Users can identify over 7,500 global clinical trial sponsors, and over 500,000 management contacts (each with a business email) working at those sponsors.

BOSTON, Jan. 9, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — karmadata® today announced the launch of Sponsor Finder™, an innovative new tool for data scientists, sales and marketing professionals at Clinical Research Organizations (CROs) and other firms that sell products and services into the global clinical trials industry. Sponsor Finder™ enables linkages to the best data sources available, including management contacts from Salesforce Data.com.

Sponsor Finder™ provides detailed profiles on over 7,500 clinical trial sponsors, including Pharmaceutical, Biotech, and Medical Device companies. Each sponsor is linked to their active and historical trials enabling detailed searches and analytics by geography, size of company, disease, and number of active or planned trials. Users can follow sponsors (or drugs or diseases) of interest, and stay informed through their feed of new activity from more than 30 healthcare data sources. Finally, each sponsor has management contacts from Salesforce Data.com, making it easy to identify new names, titles, emails, phone numbers and addresses using quick filters on titles and levels.

“We created Sponsor Finder™ in response to overwhelming demand by our clients that provide products and services to support the global clinical trials industry,” said Sean Power, karmadata’s Founder and CEO. “Sales and marketing professionals at CROs are tired of being locked into complex, outdated tools with stale data. Our ® cloud provides a great responsive web user interface that allows for rapid integration of the best new data sources. We are proving that with technology, scale, and the integration of best of breed data from places like Salesforce Data.com, you can provide a much better information service at a significantly lower cost than any other provider.”

I stumbled upon this commencement speech on WSJ.com on Friday.  It got me thinking a little bit on higher education in the US, and in particular, the core curriculum at many colleges and universities.  I think there is great value in a liberal arts education, but I always thought the core curriculum could be adjusted a little bit to guarantee some basic skills are acquired along the way.  Here is what the core curriculum looks like for the college of Arts & Sciences at my alma mater: Core Curriculum – Boston College

I like the wide spectrum of material covered and the variety of ways that it exercises the brain, but of the 15 courses needed to complete the core curriculum, I would require a computer science course (per the aforementioned article), a basic finance course, and maybe an accounting course.

Maybe there are others that should be a requirement as well?

graphic_comic_myths_long_a

Myth #1: “Our Data is Bigger and Better”

Not true. There is no secret well of untapped data sources, and no magic formula for standardizing large data sets. It takes a great effort with intricate SQL queries to standardize the data. Most do it pretty well, no one does it perfectly, but we do it as well or better than anyone else. When you join karmadata we don’t force you to adopt a proprietary taxonomy, we leave that to the industry experts. That means we speak in terms of MeSH or ICD-9 for disease, United Nations for geography, INN/USAN for drug, etc.

Myth #2: “Our Sources are Different”

Not true. The foundation of any clinical operations data solution is ClinicalTrials.gov; any inference to the contrary is disingenuous. BMIS, PubMed, and CLIIL are also essential additions. NPPES and NIH RePORTER are nice complements as well. Your data vendor probably pulls from all of these sources. But so do we.

Myth #3: “Our Data is Proprietary”

Not True. The data vendors don’t really own the data; you do. ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed, and the like are supposed to be open data sources. While there are many limitations to the data in its rawest form, that doesn’t change the fact that the data is owned by the public. Our mission is to curate the world’s open data, and give it back to the people who truly own it.